“Logan”

Hearing a drunken Logan (Hugh Jackman) utter “Fuck” in the opening of “Logan” is a clear warning that this isn’t a kid-friendly “X-Men” film. “Logan” is a grim, bloody, and depressing character study.

Set years after Logan saved the future in “Days of Future Past,” the X-Men are no more and Logan is a has-been. He’s a limo driver and drug dealer caring for a senile Professor X (Patrick Stewart). When Logan is offered a large sum of money to drive a young girl named Laura (Dafne Keen) to North Dakota, he finds that she has a lot in common with him. For example, they both have a group of cyborg mercenaries led by Donald Pierce (Boyd Holbrook) on their tale.

“Logan” is an unconventional superhero film. It has more in common with the Western and Apocalyptic Sci-Fi genre films like “Unforgiven” and “Children of Men” than it does with “X-Men.” Director James Mangold (who also directed “The Wolverine”) depicts the world of “Logan” as a sad, hopeless, and violent world that no one wishes to live in.

The journey of Logan throughout the films has been him surviving horror and war, hoping to find peace. Here, Logan’s accepted that peace is out of the question, and that he’s destined to live a never-ending life of carnage. Jackman plays the part perfectly, and it’s been an honor watching him for seventeen years.

Patrick Stewart deserves serious award recognition for his work as Charles. Whether he monologues about family or his guilt, or manically rambles about Taco Bell, Stewart is both heartbreaking and sincere, providing much-needed light to a bleak film.

The supporting cast is fine, with Boyd Holbrook playing Pierce as a fanboy who wants to be buddies with Logan, and Stephen Merchant as a mutant ally of Logan’s, but they’re mostly exposition tools. Their talent is no match for newcomer Dafne Keen, who’s the most badass on-screen kid since Eleven in “Stranger Things.”

Hugh Jackman has stated that “Logan” is his last run as Wolverine. Given it’s his ninth time playing the part, does he have to stop now? Because we can use more R-rated Wolverine movies.

Grade: A-

Ranking of the “X-Men” Films (excluding “Deadpool”):

  1. “X-Men: First Class”
  2. “X-Men: Days of Future Past”
  3. “Logan”
  4. “X2: X-Men United”
  5. “X-Men”
  6. “The Wolverine”
  7. “X-Men: Apocalypse”
  8. “X-Men: The Last Stand”
  9. “X-Men Origins: Wolverine”

“X-Men: Apocalypse”

I chuckled at a semi-meta quote in “X-Men: Apocalypse;” when Jean Grey (Sophie Turner) exits “Return of the Jedi,” she utters, “At least we can all agree the third installment is the weakest.” Because “Apocalypse” is the weakest of the new “X-Men” trilogy.

“Apocalypse” takes place ten years after “Days of Future Past,” and Professor X (James McAvoy) has turned his house into the Mutant Academy. Meanwhile, Magneto (Michael Fassbender) has settled down, whereas Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) is a mutant anti-hero, rescuing troubled mutants and starting new lives for them.

The trio are of course brought together when a god-like mutant Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac) surfaces and recruits mutants for world domination. This brings us to an introduction to a young Cyclops (Tye Sheridan) and Nightcrawler (Kodi Smit-McPhee), as well as a reunion with Beast (Nicholas Hoult), Quicksilver (Evan Peters), Havoc (Lucas Till), and Wolverine (Hugh Jackman).

It’s safe to say that while “X-Men: Apocalypse” is the weakest one of the new trilogy and very mediocre, it’s not the worst of the franchise (that goes to “The Last Stand”). The first half suffers from the most problems.

MILD SPOILERS AHEAD!!!

The first half of the film is all buildup and exposition, but it lacks focus and steady pacing to keep it interesting in most of the segments. Magneto’s story is by far the most interesting, as we understand why he’s reverted back to his old ways. The second half feels much like “Days of Future Past,” and I mean that in a good way.

Quicksilver once again has a visually impressive and fun sequence, stealing the show from everyone; this scene even tops his scene in “Days of Future Past.” For those who saw the trailer and caught a glimpse of Wolverine’s scene,  that sequence tops his mansion fight in “X2.” There are also some innovative and surreal sequences reminiscent of “Inception” that take place inside Professor X’s head, which is funny because those sequences were originally supposed to be in “First Class.”

Acting wise, the main cast does a great job as usual. I was impressed with Turner and Sheridan’s portrayal of Jean Grey and Cyclops as the angsty young lovers who stand by each other. Sadly, Oscar Isaac’s portrayal of Apocalypse and the character’s development were disappointing.

Apocalypse is a less entertaining version of Ultron from “Avengers: Age of Ultron.” These two have the same goal: recruit a group of followers, destroy the world while making their followers believe they’re saving it, and find a new body? It’s the same motivation as Ultron! Isaac also lacks charisma in this performance, and it’s sad because this is Poe Dameron from “Star Wars.”

Another small nitpick I had was that “First Class” was a spy movie and “Days of Future Past” was a time travel movie, so both had very thick plots and broad ideas; however, “Apocalypse” is simply a disaster movie, so there isn’t as much imagination as there could have been. Yet I was still entertained because of the cast and a few memorable sequences. Kudos for that!

Grade: B

“Deadpool”

If meta humor and mayhem-fueled action tickle your fancy like it does mine, “Deadpool” is for you.

MILD SPOILERS AHEAD, CHILDREN! YOU’VE BEEN WARNED!

This is Ryan Reynolds’s passion project (he’s the star and producer) as he portrays Wade Wilson, an invincible wisecracking mercenary seeking revenge. Wilson has a twisted sense of humor while on his bloodthirsty rampage (he makes a joke about killing someone in five minutes while chasing them on a Zamboni).

Ryan Reynolds hasn’t had the best luck over the last seven years with a long string of critical and commercial failures (“Green Lantern”, “RIPD” and “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” are just a few to name). Reynolds even expressed disappointment in “Origins: Wolverine”, but props to him for taking control over “Deadpool”. This is a faithful adaptation and easily a career revival for Reynolds.

Reynolds cracks self-aware jokes and pop culture references throughout “Deadpool” in the middle of action sequences. This isn’t limited to making fun of himself in “Origins: Wolverine” and “Green Lantern”, referencing the “X-Men” franchise, “Alien 3”, “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”, “The Matrix”, and Jared from Subway. Yeah, pretty good sense of humor for a disfigured maniac .

It’s the writers’ (credited in the genius opening credits as the “Real Heroes of the Movie”), script that make Reynolds shine. It’s a combination of dark comedy, romantic drama, revenge thriller, and superhero satire. First time director Tim Miller (credited as “An Overpaid Tool”) does a great job directing the intentionally clumsy and energetic action sequences without giving us a headache.

The supporting cast also has their fine moments with TJ Miller (“Silicon Valley”) as Wilson’s best friend, Morena Baccarin (“Firefly”) as Wilson’s equally sassy and vulgar girlfriend, and Ed Skrein (the original Daario Nahares in “Game of Thrones”) as a violent-yet-overly insecure villain.

The movie isn’t perfect since it’s a semi-origin story and has mild pacing issues with drawn-out flashbacks. Aside from that, “Deadpool” wastes no time entertaining us with its warped humor and badassery.

Grade: A