2017’s Best Films

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It’s time to talk about my favorite films of 2017! ItMother!, Wonder WomanSpider-Man: HomecomingSplitYour NameLogan LuckyThe Lost City of ZDetroitThor: RagnarokThe Killing of a Sacred Deer, and Wind River were all standouts, but these next ten films are my personal favorites of 2017.

10) The Shape of Water – Guillermo Del Toro’s latest fantasy film is as stunning and bizarre as his previous films, but more restrained. Del Toro focuses on an ensemble of outcasts played wonderfully by Sally Hawkins, Richard Jenkins, Michael Shannon, and Octavia Spencer. The Shape of Water also excels as a romantic comedy and cold war thriller.

9) A Ghost Story – Arguably the artsiest film on my list, David Lowery’s self-financed supernatural drama is an unforgettable experience. A Ghost Story follows a ghost (Casey Affleck) trapped in an endless time cycle and we’re stuck with him. It’s a mesmerizing little film that explores time, loneliness, and love, bending our minds in the process.

8) Logan – We had a handful of great comic book films in 2017, but Logan is my  favorite! Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart’s final outing as Wolverine and Professor X is a glorious one. Jackman and Stewart both shine as broken versions of their beloved characters; newcomer Dafnee Keene also rips up the screen as young mutant, Lara. Fans of the Old Man Logan comic should be pleased since Logan has its dread, gore, and Apocalyptic Western aesthetics.

7) The Big Sick – The Big Sick is a gem. Kumail Nanjiani delivers a moving-yet-hilarious performance as a selfish comedian torn between culture and love in this insightful semi-biographical comedy. I’m picky with rom coms, but The Big Sick is the best one I’ve seen in the last five years.

6) The Disaster Artist – The versatile James Franco directs and stars in this chaotically funny Tommy Wiseau biopic. The Disaster Artist follows the troubled production of The Room, and doesn’t just poke fun at the film or the eccentric Wiseau. It also honors Wiseau’s passion, resulting in a surprisingly inspirational comedy.

5) Baby Driver – The summer’s best movie didn’t have superheroes, intelligent apes, or aliens. It had a likable getaway driver named Baby (Ansel Elgort) who relies on his iPod to outrun the police in a series of thrilling car chases. Reminiscent of True RomanceHeatDriveThe Blues Brothers, Point Break, and La La Land, Edgar Wright’s explosive jukebox musical thriller is for fans of musicals and crime films alike.

4) Lady Bird – Greta Gerwig brings new life to the coming-of-age genre with the emotional roller coaster, Lady Bird. This is a film that balances humor, warmth, and sadness by focusing on a teenaged Lady Bird’s (Saoirse Ronan) complex relationship with her hardened mother (Laurie Metcalf). Ronan and Metcalf are the frontrunner contenders for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress due to their powerful work.

3) Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – Leave it to Martin McDonagh to craft an unconventional revenge film that doesn’t have revenge in it. This is a scathingly funny character study of broken people seeking both redemption and retribution. Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell deliver the best performances of their respective careers as an angry, grieving mother and a redeemable sociopathic cop. Don’t miss Three Billboards!

2) Blade Runner: 2049 – The masterful Denis Villeneuve carries on Ridley Scott’s legacy in this mesmerizing sequel. 2049 continues Deckard’s (Harrison Ford) storyline, leads to some brilliant twists, and introduces us to Ryan Gosling’s mysterious protagonist, K. It’s a mind-bender that makes us question our perception of reality, and it’s packed with amazing visuals (courtesy of Roger Deakins).

1) Get Out – What? Because Get Out has an A, it can’t be #1 over the A+’s? Grades are arbitrary and Jordan Peele’s directorial debut is the best film of 2017. It’s a bloody, creepy, and darkly funny commentary on racial politics. Every time I rewatch Get Out, it gets better because I notice more easter eggs and certain details. Watch it once for the entertainment value; watch it a second and third time to catch all of the subtleties. Either way, you know a movie is number one due to its rewatch value.

This was a terrific year for film and I can’t wait what next year has in store. What were some of your favorite films?


“Lady Bird”

Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut Lady Bird might have 2017’s best prologue and epilogue in film. It sums up the deep love between mother and daughter.

Set in 2003 Sacramento, high school senior Christine (Saoirse Ronan) rebels against her catholic school and overbearing mother (Laurie Metcalf). She goes by Lady Bird, secretly applies for New York colleges against her mom’s wishes, and often stirs up commotions in her catholic school. The film takes place over the course of a year and primarily focuses on Lady Bird’s ups and downs with her mother.

I’m a sucker for coming-of-age films, but I haven’t been blown away by one since 2013’s The Spectacular Now (another A24 film). Well, Lady Bird floored me. It’s poignant, funny, heartbreaking, complex, and near-perfect.

The film feels personal thanks to the realistic relationship of Lady Bird and her mom. Metcalf delivers a career-best performance as Lady Bird’s mom, who’s unpleasant and yet empathetic. The 23-year-old Ronan delivers a committed and convincing performance as the 17-year-old Lady Bird; she knows that her mom has a big heart, despite the unpleasantry. In one tense argument over laundry, Lady Bird understands her mom’s behavior when her mom mentions her own tragic upbringing. There are more powerful character-driven moments throughout the film.

Lady Bird also deals with other serious topics such as politics, religion, sex, and homosexuality. Some of the topics are handled with a sharp satirical edge (the abortion assembly scene had my theater laughing uncontrollably) while others are handled emotionally. There’s a subplot involving Lady Bird’s closeted boyfriend Danny (a terrific Lucas Hedges) who’s torn between his identity and family, which is devastating. Each character Lady Bird meets gives her a life experience and prepares her for the reality of growing up.

Back to the opening and closing scenes, they sum up the complexity of Lady Bird’s relationship with her mom. We see they deeply love each other, but also resent each other for various reasons.

I hate the term “crowd pleaser,” but given my audience’s reactions to Lady Bird, this is a crowd pleaser. It’s also a likely Best Picture contender in the upcoming Oscar season.

Grade: A+