“Avengers: Infinity War”

Hey, everyone! Sorry about being absent for the past month. I needed time to redesign my site and settle some personal things. I managed to see a bunch of movies during April that I’ll mention later in my half-time report. For now, let’s talk about Avengers: Infinity War!

Intergalactic baddie Thanos (Josh Brolin) is ready to collect the Infinity Stones. He and his henchmen travel through the galaxy, destroying everything in their path. Meanwhile, our heroes are all split in odd pairings to stop Thanos.

We have Thor (Chris Hemsworth) paired with Rocket Raccoon (Bradley Cooper) on one planet, Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.), Doctor Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch), and Spider-Man (Tom Holland) on another, the remaining Guardians of the Galaxy in space, and Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) and Captain America (Chris Evans) leading the rest of the Avengers to defend Earth. Each story has a purpose, but going into it further would lead to spoilers.

For a 159-minute movie that has over twenty-three heroes and one villain, Infinity War doesn’t lose balance. It’s focuses more on certain heroes (primarily Thor, Stark, Strange, and the Guardians) than others, but Infinity War isn’t a superhero movie; it’s a supervillain movie.

Josh Brolin has the most screen time and is a tour-de-force as the menacing purple giant. Thanos’s mission is insane, but he justifies his insanity with his tragic backstory. Thanos is reminiscent of Darth Vader in the sense he wants to be the hero, but acts in a villainous manner.

Thanos’s journey in the film leads us to some beautiful planets, nightmarish scenarios, and surprisingly brutal moments of violence. His scenes make Infinity War an uncompromising sci-fi epic that has more in common with Empire Strikes Back and Conan the Barbarian than Joss Whedon’s Avengers movies.

We also get plenty of great character moments from our other heroes. It’s fun to watch Stark and Strange bicker, Thor and Rocket form a bromance, and heartbreaking to watch Vision (Paul Bettany) and Starlord (Chris Pratt) choose between love and sacrifice. I could have used some more Captain America moments, but we’ll get more in the next film.

The Russo Brothers (who also directed Winter Soldier and Civil War) waste no time with Infinity War. We’re thrown right into the story in the first scene and have no time for a bathroom break. They do well exploring most of their characters, but it seems that the MCU doesn’t know what to do with The Hulk. Mark Ruffalo is great as Banner, but every movie changes the story of Hulk’s anger, resulting in some annoying plot holes. Maybe these will get sorted in the next movie or his own solo movie.

Avengers: Infinity War is a standout MCU film. Between it’s grim opening and jaw-dropping conclusion, I’m looking forward to what the MCU has in store for us next year.

Grade: A-

 

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“Captain America: Civil War”

The third installment of a great franchise is usually the black sheep of the family. “Alien 3” (1992), “Spider-Man 3” (2007), “X-Men: The Last Stand” (2006), “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012), etc. But how to the Russo Brothers keep topping themselves and their previous installments?!

“Captain America: Civil War” takes place a year after last year’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron” and after another catastrophic mission, Thunderbolt Ross (William Hurt’s character from the 2008 “Incredible Hulk” movie) steps in and proposes a program to register all the Avengers as government operatives. Steve Rogers/Captain America (Chris Evans) isn’t a fan of this while Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey, Jr.) is okay with being put in check.

The situation further escalates when Rogers finds his best friend Bucky (Sebastian Stan) wanted for more crimes, prompting him and Falcon (Anthony Mackie) to protect Bucky and enlist Scarlett Witch/Wanda Maximoff (Elizabeth Olsen), Clint Barton/Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), and Scott Lang/Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) to help. Iron Man, on the other hand, has Jim Rhoades/War Machine (Don Cheadle), Vision (Paul Bettany), Natasha Romanoff/Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), T’Challa/Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), and a young kid no one’s heard of named Peter Parker aka Spider-Man (Tom Holland). Who will win?!

“Civil War” begins like the same gritty spy movie/superhero hybrid that the great “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” (2014) was, but then evolves into something greater. This is an epic movie about a dysfunctional superhero family, plain simple. Rogers and Stark both have a strong case of sibling rivalry while Bucky is well, um, the black sheep! There’s much more to the movie than family metaphors… Like moral ambiguity!

“Civil War” shares the traits of some of the best spy and political thrillers, including “The Hunt for Red October” (1991) and “Crimson Tide” (1995) in which neither of our protagonists are right or wrong. It’s a debate. Would you want to surrender your freedom and be restricted? Or would you feel okay with restriction laws, knowing it’s potentially preventing more destruction?

We also get some suspenseful and masterfully directed action sequences, including one well-developed and cathartic fight between both teams at an airport. This fight emphasizes each member’s wit, power, and flaw as they beat the crap out of each other. It’s also just long enough. It’s not drawn out like the “Age of Ultron” climax.

Each cast member has their moments with Evans portraying Rogers as self-righteous, but also self-aware, Downey, Jr. playing Stark as vulnerable and lonely, Stan playing Bucky as a soldier with a lot of demons, Boseman playing T’Challa as honorable and vengeful, Holland playing Parker as a lovable smart-ass, and Rudd playing Lang as an everyman excited to be part of something bigger (it’s a better Ant-Man movie than last year’s “Ant-Man”). Daniel Brühl, of “Inglourious Basterds” (2009) and “Rush” (2013), is chilling as a mysterious villain obsessed with the Avengers.

For an ensemble comic book movie, “Civil War” is a fine example of how to confidently manage a large number of characters without getting lost in weaker subplots. I’d recommend it to comic book fans and anyone who wants to see a great, fun summer movie.

Grade: A+